Clearing the Hurdles Part II: A Guide to Setting Up a Telemedicine Program in Your Hospital

In this blog series, we’re outlining some of the major hurdles to starting a telemedicine program in the hospital setting. Part I dealt with the failure to see the strategic value of telemedicine, and how to overcome it. Here are four other strategic hurdles we have encountered in the quest to gain consensus at the medical staff and board level. Resistance comes in many forms—personal, political, institutional—but it can be overcome with a thorough understanding of telemedicine’s myriad benefits.

Clearing the Hurdles Part I: A Guide to Setting Up a Telemedicine Program in Your Hospital

Many U.S. hospitals are realizing strong returns on their investments in telemedicine. Staffing gaps are filled, patient transfers are reduced, and Leapfrog scores as well as other metrics are on the uptick. And by the way, their staffing costs have gone down. Despite the success stories, other hospitals struggle, for a variety of reasons, over the question of whether to implement telemedicine. In this new series of blog posts, we’ll cover the strategic and tactical challenges that often arise when a hospital is considering a telemedicine program, and we’ll offer tips on how to meet them. In this first installment, we discuss some of the strategic challenges involved in making the case for telemedicine and encouraging its adoption by a hospital or health system.

Preparing a Patient for Telemedicine: An Onsite Clinician’s View

Telemedicine’s acceptance among patients and providers is rapidly growing across the country. Many factors have made it possible: the quality and value of programs like Eagle’s, the dependable “always on” technology that can deliver physician expertise to hospitals anywhere, and the widespread acceptance of technological devices in our lives today. All these things have helped make telemedicine a sensible choice for more and more hospitals.

2018: Expect the Best Year Yet for Inpatient Telemedicine

Healthcare publication editors frequently ask for my predictions about inpatient telemedicine in the coming year. You may have seen one of those guest posts published last month in Electronic Health Reporter. I’ve recapped the predictions below, but to sum them up in one line: It’s going to be another good year for telemedicine―perhaps the best yet. Momentum has been building for the increased acceptance of telemedicine in the hospital setting.

A Hospital Nurse Practitioner Shares the Benefits of Working with Eagle Telemedicine Backup Support

“I couldn’t do what I do without them.” That’s how one Nurse Practitioner (NP) at a critical-access hospital in rural Kansas sums up the backup support she gets from hospitalists in the Eagle Telemedicine program at her facility. Rebecca Carter, APRN, was a champion of the telemedicine program when it began at Anthony Medical Center (AMC) in Anthony, Kan., in January 2015. Today, nearly three years later, she is a stronger champion than ever.

Eagle Telemedicine Moves Forward as Stand-Alone Company

You might have seen the recent news that the hospitalist practices of Eagle Hospital Physicians have joined Sound Inpatient Physicians effective Mar. 1, 2017. What does it mean for Eagle Telemedicine? Without the responsibility of managing those hospitalist practices, the leadership at Eagle can now focus resources on the continued expansion of our telemedicine practices—and continued leadership in the rapidly evolving field of telemedicine.

Telenephrology, Night Coverage and Other Hot Topics from the ATA Fall Forum

Our Job #1 as leaders of a telemedicine and hospitalist management company is to respond quickly to the needs of hospitals and stay attuned to their challenges. That’s why we make it a practice to attend the American Telemedicine Association’s annual Fall Forum—not only to share news about our programs with hospitals and physicians, but…

For the Sake of Patients and Providers, We Need a Uniform Approach to Telemedicine Reimbursement

Most of us are aware of the shortage of physicians, exacerbated in many geographic areas, and typically worst at night and on weekends. Physicians utilizing telemedicine technology have demonstrated time and time again the ability to provide quality care via telemedicine on a 24/7 basis virtually anywhere. It is not technology or physician capability that…