Success Story: Tele-ID Virtually Eliminates Infectious Disease Transfers for One Hospital Group

At first glance, one might think that telemedicine wouldn’t be the best medium for diagnosing and treating patients with infectious diseases (IDs). There is, after all, nothing to “listen to” in conditions of sepsis, infected wounds from diabetes or other ailments, meningitis, osteomyelitis, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) or other infections—nothing a stethoscope on a videoconferencing cart can pick up from the sound of a patient’s heartbeat or stomach. But look again.

Eagle Technology Enabled Inpatient Care - Ethos

Technology-Enabled Inpatient Care. How does Eagle deliver it? ETHOS is the key.

I’ve written frequently in previous blog posts about our physicians’ “webside manner”—their skills in communicating with patients, families and hospital clinical staff. They are very good at making everyone comfortable with the telemedicine environment. But they don’t go it alone. They are partners with hospital clinical staff who serve as their hands when consulting with, diagnosing, and treating patients.

2019: The Growth Trend Will Continue for Inpatient Telemedicine

It was abundantly clear in 2018 that there is a new reality in U.S. inpatient care. As I wrote in my year-end blog last month, most hospitals across the country have embraced the value equation telemedicine offers. No longer viewed as a novelty, telemedicine will continue to gain ground in hospitals in 2019—both in general hospitalist services and in a wider range of specialty offerings.

The Outmigration Dilemma: How to Stem the Tide of Transfers from Rural Hospitals

Telemedicine is a rewarding field to be in for many reasons. We make healthcare easier to access for patients and their families. We’re saving doctors from burnout. We help hospitals find a sustainable solution to complex challenges. It’s extremely gratifying to be part of an industry that does so much good. Take, for example, the recent upsurge in the number of rural county hospital leaders who raise legitimate concerns about patient transfers and don’t know how to stop the outflow, or “outmigration” as we’ve heard it referred to.

Considering Telemedicine? Don’t Wait For a Crisis

With our history of providing telemedicine services to hospitals for nearly a decade, it’s interesting to see the change in the industry, the growing acceptance of telemedicine by patients, providers and—slowly but surely—payers. It’s also interesting to observe the changes in how we talk about what we do. Ten years ago, we spent much of our time talking with hospital executives about why they needed us. Today, it’s more a question of when.

2018: Expect the Best Year Yet for Inpatient Telemedicine

Healthcare publication editors frequently ask for my predictions about inpatient telemedicine in the coming year. You may have seen one of those guest posts published last month in Electronic Health Reporter. I’ve recapped the predictions below, but to sum them up in one line: It’s going to be another good year for telemedicine―perhaps the best yet. Momentum has been building for the increased acceptance of telemedicine in the hospital setting.